Javascript Menu by Deluxe-Menu.com

 

When Thou didst descend to death, O Life Immortal,

Thou didst slay Hell with the splendor of Thy Godhead.

And when from the depths Thou didst raise the dead,

all the Powers of Heavens cried aloud:

O Giver of Life, Christ our God, glory to Thee.

-Troparion of the Resurrection. Tone 2.

 

 

Welcome to Holy Resurrection!
A personal welcome…

 

Welcome to Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church, Tacoma Washington. We pray that your visit will be a source of blessing for you. Though our manner of Christian worship is centuries old, most Americans find it a bit different at first -- but watch and listen, and the timeless beauty of heavenly, eternal worship will begin to reveal itself to you.  Please, when you visit, don't worry about "doing the right thing;" we count it a sin to judge others while we pray (Luke 18:10-14). As you will see, we do like to stand in the presence of God, but if you need to sit, please do so! While the worship of the Holy Trinity is the very heart and foundation of our community and faith, we also find encouragement in fellowship with one another through our various parish activities. You will find that we simply enjoy being with each other!

 

We are one of the oldest Orthodox Christian communities in the United States, and the first to use English exclusively in Washington. Having outgrown historic Holy Trinity church in Wilkeson, we have moved into our new home southeast of Tacoma city limits. Here, amidst ten beautiful acres of field and forest, we have built and have had to enlarge preliminary buildings as we grow and welcome more people to our faith. There is no hiding the fact that we are very excited to be a part of one of the fastest-growing faiths in North America, while at the same time a part of the oldest Christian Church in the world. Most of us were new visitors once, and most of us are converts to Orthodox Christianity!

 

Whether you spend a morning, an evening or a lifetime, you will at least have come away with the experience of how, for centuries, countless millions of Christians have worshiped the Most Holy Trinity throughout Eastern Europe and the lands around the eastern Mediterranean. It is a way shaped by the churches of Jerusalem, Antioch and Constantinople, a way inspired by Kiev and Moscow: now it is our turn in Pierce County, Washington, and we would be blessed to have you be a part of it!

 

God bless you! 

The Clergy and Faithful of Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church

 

 

Nativity of the Theotokos - September 8th

 

Sermon on the Nativity of the Theotokos

Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann


The Church’s veneration of Mary has always been rooted in her obedience to God, her willing choice to accept a humanly impossible calling. The Orthodox Church has always emphasized Mary’s connection to humanity and delighted in her as the best, purest, most sublime fruition of human history and of man’s quest for God, for ultimate meaning, for ultimate content of human life.

If in Western Christianity veneration of Mary was centered upon her perpetual virginity, the heart of Orthodox Christian East’s devotion, contemplation, and joyful delight has always been her Motherhood, her flesh and blood connection to Jesus Christ. The East rejoices that the human role in the divine plan is pivotal. The Son of God comes to earth, appears in order to redeem the world, He becomes human to incorporate man into His divine vocation, but humanity takes part in this. If it is understood that Christ’s “co-nature” with us is as a human being and not some phantom or bodiless apparition, that He is one of us and forever united to us through His and forever united to us through His humanity, then devotion to Mary also becomes understandable, for she is the one who gave Him His human nature, His flesh and blood. She is the one through whom Christ can always call Himself “The Son of Man.”

Son of God, Son of Man…God descending and becoming man so that man could become divine, could become partaker of the divine nature (2 Peter 1:4), or as the teachers of Church expressed it, “deified.” Precisely here, in this extraordinary revelation of man’s authentic nature and calling, is the source that gratitude and tenderness which cherishes Mary as our link to Christ and, in Him, to God. And nowhere is this reflected more clearly that in the Nativity of the Mother of God.

Nothing about this event is mentioned anywhere in the Holy Scriptures. But why should there be? Is there anything remarkable, anything especially unique about the normal birth of a child, a birth like any other? The Church began to commemorate the event with a special feast…because, on the contrary, the very fact that it is routine discloses something fresh and radiant about everything we call routine and ordinary, it gives new depth to the unremarkable details of human life…And with each birth the world is itself in some sense created anew and given as a gift to this new human being to be his life, his path, his creation.

This feast therefore is first a general celebration of Man’s birth, and we no longer remember the anguish, as the Gospel says, “for joy that a human being is born into the world” (Jn. 16:21). Secondly, we now know whose particular birth, whose coming we celebrate: Mary’s. We know the uniqueness, the beauty, the grace of precisely this child, her destiny, her meaning for us and for the whole world. And thirdly, we celebrate all who prepared the way for Mary, who contributed to her inheritance of grace and beauty…And therefore the Feast of her Nativity is also a celebration of human history, a celebration of faith in man, a celebration of man.

Sadly, the inheritance of evil is far more visible and better known. There is so much evil around us that this faith in man, in his freedom, in the possibility of handing down a radiant inheritance of goodness has almost evaporated and been replaced by cynicism and suspicion. This hostile cynicism and discouraging suspicion are precisely what seduce us to distance ourselves from the Church when it celebrates with such joy and faith this birth of a little girl in whom are concentrated all the goodness, spiritual beauty, harmony and perfection that are elements of genuine human nature. Thus, in celebrating Mary’s birth we find ourselves already on the road to Bethlehem, moving toward the joyful mystery of Mary as the Mother to God.

First Visit to an Orthodox Church?
Twelve things I wish I'd known...

"Orthodox worship is different! Some of these differences are apparent, if perplexing, from the first moment you walk in a church. Others become noticeable only over time. Here is some information that may help you feel more at home in Orthodox worship..."

 

Read renowned Eastern Orthodox author/speaker, Frederica Mathewes-Green, on the
Twelve things she wished she had known before her first visit to an Orthodox church.

 

 

Recommended Listening


Ancient Faith Radio provides high quality 24 hour internet based Orthodox radio as well as podcasts, including music, teaching, interviews, features, convert testimonies, conference recordings, and much more.

 


  Powered by Orthodox Web Solutions

Home | Back | Print | Top