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Thou didst descend from on high, O Merciful One
Thou didst endure the three day burial
To free us from our sufferings.
O Lord, our Life and Resurrection,
Glory to Thee!

-Troparion of the Resurrection. Tone 8.

Welcome to Holy Resurrection!
A personal welcome…

 

Welcome to Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church, Tacoma Washington. We pray that your visit will be a source of blessing for you. Though our manner of Christian worship is centuries old, most Americans find it a bit different at first — but watch and listen, and the timeless beauty of heavenly, eternal worship will begin to reveal itself to you.  Please, when you visit, don't worry about "doing the right thing;" we count it a sin to judge others while we pray (Luke 18:10-14). As you will see, we do like to stand in the presence of God, but if you need to sit, please do so! While the worship of the Holy Trinity is the very heart and foundation of our community and faith, we also find encouragement in fellowship with one another through our various parish activities. You will find that we simply enjoy being with each other!

 

We are one of the oldest Orthodox Christian communities in the United States, and the first to use English exclusively in Washington. Having outgrown historic Holy Trinity church in Wilkeson, we have moved into our new home southeast of Tacoma city limits. Here, amidst ten beautiful acres of field and forest, we have built and have had to enlarge preliminary buildings as we grow and welcome more people to our faith. There is no hiding the fact that we are very excited to be a part of one of the fastest-growing faiths in North America, while at the same time a part of the oldest Christian Church in the world. Most of us were new visitors once, and most of us are converts to Orthodox Christianity!

 

Whether you spend a morning, an evening or a lifetime, you will at least have come away with the experience of how, for centuries, countless millions of Christians have worshiped the Most Holy Trinity throughout Eastern Europe and the lands around the eastern Mediterranean. It is a way shaped by the churches of Jerusalem, Antioch and Constantinople, a way inspired by Kiev and Moscow: now it is our turn in Pierce County, Washington, and we would be blessed to have you be a part of it!

 

God bless you! 

The Clergy and Faithful of Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church

 

The Transfiguration of our Lord - August 6

Thou wast transfigured on the Mount, O Christ God,
Revealing Thy glory to Thy disciples as far as they could bear it.
Let Thine everlasting Light shine upon us sinners,
Through the prayers of the Theotokos, O Giver of Light, glory to Thee!
-Troparion of the Transfiguration of our Lord

 

 

The transfiguration of Christ is one of the central events recorded in the gospels. Immediately after the Lord was recognized by his apostles as “the Christ [Messiah], the Son of the Living God,” he told them that “he must go up to Jerusalem and suffer many things ... and be killed and on the third day be raised” (Mt 16). The announcement of Christ’s approaching passion and death was met with indignation by the disciples. And then, after rebuking them, the Lord took Peter, James, and John “up to a high mountain”—by tradition Mount Tabor—and was “transfigured before them.”


... and his face shone like the sun, and his garments became white as snow and behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. And Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is well that we are here; if you wish I will make three booths here, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” He was still speaking when lo, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my Beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.” When the disciples heard this, they fell on their faces with awe. But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Rise, and have no fear.” And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one but Jesus only. And as they were coming down the mountain, Jesus commanded them, “Tell no one the vision, until the Son of Man is raised from the dead” (Mt 17:1-92, see also Mk 9:1-9; Lk 9:28-36; 2 Peter 1:16-18).


The Jewish Festival of Booths was a feast of the dwelling of God with men, and the transfiguration of Christ reveals how this dwelling takes place in and through the Messiah, the Son of God in human flesh. There is little doubt that Christ’s transfiguration took place at the time of the Festival of Booths, and that the celebration of the event in the Christian Church became the New Testamental fulfillment of the Old Testamental feast in a way similar to the feasts of Passover and Pentecost.

In the Transfiguration, the apostles see the glory of the Kingdom of God present in majesty in the person of Christ They see that in him, indeed, all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell,” that “in him the whole fulness of deity dwells bodily” (Col 1:19, 2:9). They see this before the crucifixion so that in the resurrection they might know who it is who has suffered for them, and what it is that this one, who is God, has prepared for those who love him. This is what the Church celebrates in the feast of the Transfiguration. (read more)

 

18th All-American Council Recapped

Hierarchs, clergy and faithful from across the US, Canada and Mexico arrived in Atlanta, GA for the 18th All-American Council of the Orthodox Church in America, held July 20-24, 2015.

The subject of this Council — How to Expand the Mission  recalls St. Patriarch Tikhon's admonition at the first Sobor in Mayfield. This year's Council focus was on the mission opportunities that have yet to be explored throughout the OCA.

 

Parish Camping Trip!
August 16-19

Last year was such a wonderful experience, we’re scheduling again — bigger and better!

 

Sign up on the site or the parish bulletin board! Mark your calendars! We have reserved two group sites at Cougar Rock Campground in Mount Rainier National Park for August 16-19! We will offer two group hikes —one more strenuous, one less each day. Evenings will include campfires, so bring your instruments! (read more)

 

First Visit to an Orthodox Church?
12 Things I Wish I’d Known - by Kh. Frederica Mathewes-Green

Orthodox worship is different! Some of these differences are apparent, if perplexing, from the first moment you walk in a church. Others become noticeable only over time. Here is some information that may help you feel more at home in Orthodox worship—twelve things I wish I’d known before my first visit to an Orthodox church.

 

1. What’s all this commotion?

During the early part of the service the church may seem to be in a hubbub, with people walking up to the front of the church, praying in front of the iconostasis (the standing icons in front of the altar), kissing things and lighting candles, even though the service is already going on. In fact, when you came in the service was already going on, although the sign outside clearly said “Divine Liturgy, 9:30.” You felt embarrassed to apparently be late, but these people are even later, and they’re walking all around inside the church. What’s going on here? (read more)

 

Recommended Listening

These following podcasts are made available by Ancient Faith Radio. They are just a few of the many podcasters that provide high quality 24-hour internet-based Orthodox radio including live music streaming, teaching, readings,  interviews, lectures, conference recordings, live call-in programs, an extensive list of downloadable Orthodox podcasts and much, much more at AFR!

The Bible’s Grand Narrative” with Marcia Harris Brim makes clear why knowing Scripture’s story matters to every human life. It reveals the Bible as a unified narrative by following the literary forms of Genesis 1-5 through the last chapters of Revelation. These forms are the story threads that weave together the Bible’s meaning and purpose into a storied tapestry of truth, goodness, and beauty. This study is for Christians from any expression of faith, as well as for those who are undecided about faith in general.

 

In "The Names of Jesus", Fr. Thomas Hopko (memory eternal) identifies the fifty-five names bestowed on Christ by the Holy Scriptures and the Church Fathers and explains their significance.

"Glorify God in Your Body" was the subject of St. Iakovos Orthodox Church's (Valparaiso, IN) second annual Health and Wellness Retreat. The speaker was Fr. Andrew Jarmus of St. Nicholas Orthodox Church (Fort Wayne, IN), and he delivered three separate lectures: “Body as Both Ally and Adversary,” “The Connection Between Our Physical and Spiritual Well-Being,” and “What Current Clinical Research Is Discovering About the Age-Old Spiritual Practices of Our Tradition.”


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